Moneyball

moneyball-audiobook-mp3Unabridged Audiobook
Written By: Michael Lewis
Narrated By: Scott Brick
Publisher: Random House Audio
Duration: 10 Hours 27 Minutes

Book Rating: stars_4-5

audiobook_play_button2

audiobook_download_button2

 

Summary: Moneyball reveals a quest for something as elusive as the Holy Grail, something that money apparently can’t buy: the secret of success in baseball. The logical places to look would be the giant offices of Major League teams and the dugouts. But the real jackpot is a cache of numbers collected over the years by a strange brotherhood of amateur baseball enthusiasts: software engineers, statisticians, Wall Street analysts, lawyers, and physics professors.

In a narrative full of fabulous characters and brilliant excursions into the unexpected, Lewis shows us how and why the new baseball knowledge works. He also sets up a sly and hilarious morality tale: Big Money, like Goliath, is always supposed to win…. How can we not cheer for David…Read more.

User Reviews

userid_24375
Tina H.

stars_4 Much better than the movie! Go A’s!!!!

 

 

 

userid_20951
Monique M.

stars_4-5 Incredible story. Had no idea about this before listening.

 

 

 

userid_10007
Max R.

stars_3-5 Pretty good.

 

get access now

To claim your free Moneyball audiobook download, all you have to do is click the link on this page. You’ll be taken to a free registration form, where you can sign up to get a free mp3 download, mobile apps, and more!

This offer is available for a limited time only and has absolutely no cost to you, so sign up for free today!

Michael Lewis: Moneyball Audio Book Summary

Moneyball is a book by Michael Lewis published in 2003 and later served for the 2011 film adaptation directed by Bennett Miller and starring Brad Pitt and Jonah Hill.
Michael Lewis’s Moneyball is about a man he sought, and found a way to win a series of games where he was at a disadvantage compared to his opponents.
download-michael-lewis-moneyball-audiobookThe story follows closely the Oakland Athletics baseball team during the 2002 season. Its manager Billi Beane and his assistant, Paul DePodesta, were applying Sabermetrics ie they were looking for specific profiles of players with certain qualities that the rest of the league had Despised or not valued, the intention of these two personages, was to form a great team, but with a low budget. His payroll was $ 40 million, compared to that of the New York Yankees for $ 126 million.
The baseball world largely doubted Beane’s sanity, who not only looked at regular batting average, home run or imploding statistics, but was looking for valuable insights into the players.
A’s experiment worked and the team made a historic streak of 20 consecutive wins coming into the playoffs. So far, A’s analytical tactics have been widely adopted by Major League Baseball.
What Beane did, consisted of a whole revolution in the way players are selected, seen and even paid.
Moneyball is also partly Beane’s biography since he was a baseball player until the direction of the team of the Oakland A. Lewis, also devotes a part of the book to Bill James, who is the man behind the advanced statistics founder of the compilation Statistics Baseball Abstract, that is, the true father of the Sabermetría. That would be implemented by Beane on his team.
The knowmetry, which was the method applied by Beane, is ne simple terms, a novel trend in the study of baseball that is based on rigorous non-traditional statistical study and a constant search to understand how to play baseball better.

 

A favorable feature of Lewis’s work is that in addition to showing baseball statistics, the author makes the story more convincing by telling us a bit about sports psychology and game theory in a way that is understandable to everyone.
In conclusion, Moneyball is a great book not only for sports fans, but for any reader who values ​​a story about people who must do beyond what is in their hands to achieve a goal. It is also a book that can definitely appeal to people who enjoy math and statistics.
It is a work impeccably narrated and with a good documentary sustenance ranging from hard data to issues as human as the personality of the players or the autobiographical and sports anecdotes.